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On loss and respect

June 20, 2013
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It’s been a tough couple of months for the carwashing industry. First we lost John Jurkens, the founder of Octopus Carwash who died on January 7. Next we lost Sonny Fazio, the founder of SONNY’s The Car Wash Factory, on April 17. Then Kerry Shimada of Arcadian Services passed away on May 4. And, finally, we lost Lucian “Mac” McElroy, founder of Proto-Vest died on May 8. All four were well-known and respected men amongst the industry. It makes me wonder who the new distinguished faces of the industry will be. Will we continue to have icons and luminaries? Hopefully, people involved now are making their mission statements, policies and personalities well known and respected so that carwash owners and operators have a person they can talk to and trust when they have a concern or question.

And now I would like to address a very important topic that needs to be taken very seriously. I have found myself coming across more stories online about carwash workers being disrespected while at work. Some carwashes in California and New York have been investigated and fined and charges are pending. The carwash workers were brave enough to come forward and tell their stories. Good for them. I don’t understand how this keeps happening and how a carwash owner could allow any of their employees to be disrespected or not paid fairly or given proper breaks. If you a carwash owner who has been called out for unfair practices, or even if you’re an owner who has not been caught, and you’re reading my editorial right now. I suggest you rethink your business practices and seek help. The carwashing industry is one of integrity, altruism and pride and you’re not welcome in this industry if you’re not treating your employees fairly.

If you are an owner or operator who treats their employees with respect and fairness, I applaud you and would like to remind you to stay the course. Your way of doing business is not something that should have to be complimented, it is just the way things should be. Yet, I applaud you any way, because you’re not only representing the industry in a positive way, but you’re also making a positive difference in your employee’s life.

Until next month,

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