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Adding on with ease

Modular buildings are one way to add on a carwash, quick lube, c-store or detail bay to an existing business.

January 27, 2014
KEYWORDS new business
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Charlie Zimmerman, national sales manager for Genesis Modular Car Wash Building Systems, a company based in Georgia which delivers modular carwashes, quick lubes, detail shops and c-stores all over the United States and parts of Canada, said that when choosing a modular company, you should consider one in which the plumbing and electrical is already installed and one that’s made of steel. You also have to do some homework and make sure you’re working under the conditions of your state-based modular approval certification program.

To get a better understanding of what a project of this magnitude involves, Zimmerran offers the following steps and photos to show how a modular additional profit center is added.

  1. Determine the square-footage available on your property. Make sure the model you choose can deliver maximum production.
  2. Hire a civil engineer to draw up a blueprint containing site elevations.
  3. Find a modular building company that will act as your architect, design and engineer your project.
  4. Work in conjunction with your equipment manufacture for specifications and recommendations.
  5. Complete Drawings for State Approval Certification to speed up the process through the local planning office. Every state has its own modular approval certification process.
  6. Hire a General Contractor for foundation and site completion.
  7. The building is manufactured with equipment, concrete floors, plumbing, electrical and mechanical systems installed, delivered and erected with onsite completion done in a few days.
  8. Your contractor provides utility  hook-ups, and your distributor makes the final connections.
  9. Your contractor completes the final paving and landscaping.
  10. Once the building is ready, your marketing and grand opening planning can begin.

Zimmerman said you can reduce onsite risk exposure by minimizing onsite construction time and reducing cost over-runs with a modular building and normally, the time to market is reduced 30-50 percent. He also added that the building qualifies for an accelerated depreciation schedule (7 years versus 39 years).

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