Professional Carwashing & Detailing

Bug remover cleans more than bugs

October 15, 2013

Bug removal is not as easy as a simple carwash in some states. Some pests are more likely to create issues for carwash operators based on their size and ‘what’s inside.’ Much of the time a chemical is needed to ensure bugs are fully removed from the vehicle.

 “It’s an alkaline chemical,” Stinger Chemicals Carwash Specialist Myrick Morriss said. “It kind of eats the bugs from the inside out.”

The removal chemical is super concentrated and should be applied at a ratio of 36:1. Morriss recommends that a full service wash put the remover on in the beginning of the wash so it has a moment to dissolve the bug remains before it is hit with high pressure wash gun. The same goes for the tunnel, however, he recommends using a 24:1 ratio which would allow the rest of the equipment to do the work.

Morriss says operators need to be careful when using the product as it would dry on the car surface and potentially damage the paint.

Mosquitoes and love bugs are the most common pests that end up on the windshields and front bumpers of cars and customers sometimes use household cleaners and scrubbers, such as sponges and scratch pads, to remove the bug residue from their vehicles.

Clean Ride Car Wash Owner R.B. Powell says the bug remover chemical does far more than remove bugs. He says it easily takes tree sap off of cars as well as the waste from birds. Powell offers the service on his $8 and $12 wash packages in the beginning of his 120-foot tunnel. Powell says the salt and grass mosquito season in Alvin, Texas, is about eight months out of the year so it was important to his when he opened his carwash three years ago to have a product that would effectively remove bugs from cars.

“[The customers] love it,” Powell said.

Powell explains that he has less than a dozen rewashes, related to bugs and other sticky residue, a month.

“I’m not tooting anyone’s horn,” Powell said. “If it didn’t work I wouldn’t use it.”