During winter, it’s important all carwash employees wear appropriate workwear. Freezing temperatures and wet weather can put your employees’ health and safety at risk.

Winter weather means colder temperatures and higher likelihood of ice. To keep your employees safe, they need to be wearing appropriate workwear.

In 2013, it was estimated 724 fatal injuries were caused by falls, slips and trips in the U.S. There is a higher chance of falls in the winter season because of the increased possibility of rain, snow and ice.

Additionally, working outside in the cold increases your likelihood of getting a cold, flu and hypothermia. Most carwash employees work their entire shifts outside and have to endure the elements; so what they wear can protect their health.

It’s your responsibility to make sure your employees are safe at work. You can help by making sure they’re wearing appropriate workwear. In this blog post, we will discuss how wearing the right clothes for work can keep your employees safe in winter.

Keeping dry

Waterproof clothing is essential during winter because it can protect you from wind and rain. Wearing wet clothes while working in low temperatures can increase your chances of getting ill.

You can lower the chance of employees having to take time off work because of illness by making sure they’re wearing waterproof coats and trousers. Employees can also keep their feet dry by wearing waterproof or water-resistant shoes.

Insulating core heat

At a carwash, employees will usually get wet from sprays and washes. When the weather is hot, this isn’t a big issue. However during winter, being wet can put you at a greater risk of hypothermia and, in extreme cases, frostbite.

Wearing the right clothes during winter can help insulate your core body heat. Maintaining your core body temperature is important when the weather is freezing. When your body heat is below 95 degrees Fahrenheit (35 degrees Celsius), you’ll likely have hypothermia which is caused by long-term exposure to cold weather. Thermal clothing can be worn beneath shirts and pants to insulate body heat; and the microfibers used in the thermal material are perfect insulators.

Protecting extremities

Wearing thermal socks, gloves and hats are ideal for keeping feet, hands and heads warm. It’s easy to lose heat from your extremities; and because there is an increased chance of falling on wet and ice covered surfaces, keeping hands and heads covered can offer extra protection if an employee does suffer a fall.

Improving visibility

In winter, it can be dark in the morning and dark in the late afternoon. High-visibility clothing should be worn by all employees who work outside. Especially in a carwash, employees are working around moving cars; and because of darker conditions, drivers might struggle to see them.

Hi-vis clothing makes them more visible. You can get high visibility jackets, vests and pants which can be worn over work clothes.

Safety shoes

Waterproof and slip-resistant shoes are a must for employees who work in wet conditions. During winter, carwashes will likely have more chances of ice because of wet working areas. Shoes with no grip are not appropriate for working in a carwash because employees have a higher chance of slipping on wet surfaces.

When you’re busy working, you might not realize ice is on the floor. You can keep employees safe by making sure they’re wearing shoes with a high-quality, slip-resistant grip.

Specialist workwear can keep your employees safe at work during the winter season and lower chances of any work-related injuries.


Xamax Clothing is a workwear and promotional clothing specialist, with more than 20 years of experience and expertise. The company provides organizations and teams with affordable, quality clothing that can be branded to unique specifications and requirements. Xamax supplies call center employees and roadside workers to university clubs and sports teams. The company has an extensive range of merchandise to choose from. Please contact Xamax at 01924 919424.

 

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