CHICAGO ­— According to the article “Southeast faces drought, ICA responds with targeted campaign” posted by the International Carwash Association (ICA), ICA is launching a campaign to bring information about carwash water conservation efforts to consumers and regulators.

More than 60 percent of the combined southeastern states of Alabama, Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Virginia are in various stages of drought as of the last week of November, the article stated.

This drought affects over 20 million people, the article continued, and local and state authorities have already implemented water conservation measures, such as reducing outside watering.

Related article: Survival during drought

Water-saving and pollution-prevention campaigns are underway, and in order to protect carwashes from any negative effects of these campaigns, the ICA has put together a list of considerations for carwashes:

  • Highlight your wash’s water conservation efforts. According to the ICA, “A garden hose can use more than 60 gallons in as little as five minutes and home washing machines can use 45 gallons per load.” Compare these usage rates to your carwash’s own and get the word out.
  • Highlight how your carwash prevents pollution. Research has shown that driveway/pavement carwashing in just a medium-sized town alone can produce hundreds of pounds of pollution. Again, compare this statistic to your eco-friendly efforts.
  • Keep customers informed. Make sure customers understand that one of the reasons to keep their cars clean is for safety.
  • Read ICA’s Drought Response Plan. Note that this plan takes into account the research showing that carwashes use less than one percent of a city’s water.
  • Use WaterSavers® signage. If you are a member of the WaterSavers® program, use its signage and messages. Members of WaterSavers® are included on the ICA’s website of environmentally responsible carwashes.
  • Get certified. For carwashes in North Carolina and Georgia, consider getting your wash certified as a water-saving business to protect you from water restrictions. These programs were championed largely through the efforts of the North Carolina Professional Carwash Association and the Georgia Coalition of Car Washes.

In order to create a more effective educational campaign, ICA asks that you share the contact information of your local water regulators with them by sending the information directly to Claire Moore at cmoore@carwash.org.

To read the full article, click here.