WASHINGTON — The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) says General Motors Co. (GM) is not to blame for possible corroded brake lines, according to Techtimes.com.

NHTSA investigated the issue for four years before clearing GM of recalling about two million sport utility vehicles (SUVs), noted the article. The agency issued advisories about the issue for 1999-2003 truck models.

After the probe, NHTSA declared these vehicles’ owners should prevent the corrosion of brake lines by washing their cars with undercarriage rinses, reported the article. Vehicles investigated included Cadillac, GMC and Chevrolet models.

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"GM has proactively suggested to consumers that they perform regular undercarriage cleaning and post-winter brake line inspections to check for wear," said Alan Adler, a General Motors spokesman, in an official email, according to the article.

The brake line issue sparked 3,049 complaints, shared the article. Those from cold-weather states numbered 2,702.

GM faced lawsuits, a criminal investigation and congressional hearings after faulty ignition switches were found in 2.59 million vehicles, stated the article.

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