According to the article, “5 tips for proposal professionals going through mergers and acquisitions” by contributor Brenda Crist on www.exclusive.multibriefs.com, mergers and acquisitions (M&A) affect many people each year. It can be difficult to determine how an M&A will affect you, but as long as you don’t react on the fly and take some time to get the facts, you can make an informed decision about what to do. Therefore, if your company is going through an M&A, Crist offers these five tips:

  • Learn more about the M&A. Find out why your company merged or was acquired. Learn who the leadership team is for the new company, and find out if there is a timetable for organizational and policy changes. Find out if that team has any specific plans for your business location (relocation, remodeling, etc.). Understand that new leadership usually takes a few months to implement its changes.
  • Find out where you fit in. Determine whether or not you will still have a position in the business or if you could be laid off or promoted. If the new leadership does not have answers yet, let the team know how you can be of service and how your knowledge can benefit the transition.
  • Figure out how you can contribute to the new company. Determine what skills and expertise you have that can both help with the transition as well as the company’s short- and long-term plans. If there are gaps in your skills or knowledge, figure out how you can fill them to keep yourself relevant and up-to-date.
  • Determine if the new company will support your career objectives. Work with your supervisor and human resources department (if available) to look over your career options. Will there be room for advancement at the new company? Will it help train you or invest in other education and certification opportunities that apply towards your work? Is a mentor for the new company available to support your professional growth?
  • Find out about compensation. Will the new company be able to provide competitive compensation? Are the terms of your employment going to change at all? If there are new terms, will it affect your work-life balance?

Read the original article here.