Water recycling equipment may require a heavy investment, but the cost can pay off. Chuck Howard, CEO of Autobell Car Wash Inc., shares that with increasing rates and tap fees for new locations, these systems are more feasible.

Howard states, “Having a system of this type could make the difference between staying open and being forced to close in future times of drought.”

Tom Doll, executive vice president of sales and marketing for APANA, cites a 2014 U.S. Water Industry Report by Black & Veatch, which reports, “[Forty percent] of U.S. water utilities said they will need to enact [five to 10 percent] annual rate increases for the next decade just to cover costs. [Twenty percent] said they would need more than a [10 percent] increase, which would double water rates in seven years.”

When considering making the investment in reclaim equipment, owners should contemplate installation time and calibrate the systems for their unique infrastructures, Doll notes. A professional plumber can usually install and calibrate the most accurate, high-resolution system.

State rebates can cover up to 50 percent of installation costs, although, Doll cautions, these allowances will expire when funding runs out. However, before that happens, the combination of water cost and rebate savings provides an attractive payback time frame, he believes.

Dean Taylor, technical sales engineer with CATEC Water Recovery and Ozone Systems, asserts that for some businesses reclamation systems are essential for operations, since cost reduction often drives owners to explore ways to conserve water. These programs can also contribute to greater customer traffic.

“As the general public becomes more and more aware of the need to conserve water, many owners are now advertising that they are recycling their water to help cater to this new mindset,” says Taylor.

You can read more on managing drought conditions here.